Practical and Helpful Tips: Training

Tips for Military Spouses Seeking to Further Their Education

If you’re a military spouse, building on your education can be good for your family in several ways. Financially, it can surely enhance your earning power and help fetch career opportunities. Personally speaking, a higher education can offer you a feeling of achievement that increases your confidence in yourself and what the future brings. Here are tips for you to consider:

Reflect on your overall goals, career-wise and personally.

Focus on something that stimulates your personal and professional interests. Build a career that offers desirable pay, a stable work-life balance, and overall satisfaction.

Get to know the job market in the field you’ve chosen.

Are there good and readily available opportunities? Furthermore, are there certain regions of the country where this profession will not be as lucrative? If opportunities are restrictive, it may not be worth your while – or your money – to obtain a degree or certification.

Make use of suitable financial assistance or military spouse scholarship programs.

There are plenty of programs that military spouses will find useful as they further their education. Military Spouse Career Advancement Account (MyCAA), for one,can cover up to $4000 worth of costs if you’re seeking an associate degree, license, or credential. A lot of state colleges and universities apply in-state tuition rates, regardless of residence duration. Also, a lot of army spouse training scholarship programs are using varied ways of providing financial aid, including federal loans that charge very cheap interest. The military also gives financial assistance to those who live in the United States while their spouses are stationed in a foreign country.

Explore online career training for military spouses.

Military families usually relocate, sometimes making it hard to complete local education programs. Online Portable Career Training Programs offer flexibility that military families can surely benefit from.

Fight for your transfer credits.

If you earned college credits from your old school and your target military spouse school will not give them credit, challenge this position. Schools often have a process for this, and your counselor should be able to help in this regard. More information, such as a course syllabus, is often requested. Challenges are generally successful upon providing additional information regarding those grades you have worked hard for in the past. If you end up with most of your credits still unaccepted, you can consider other schools which may be more consistent with your old school when it comes to accreditation and curriculum, and probably have transfer agreements in place (for example, junior colleges with local universities).

Act with good timing.

As you can probably envision, combining the responsibilities of family work and school can be very demanding. Make sure you have everything planned out so that you don’t have to sacrifice any of these areas.